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Emerald Ash Borer Treatments Buyer Beware

Emerald Ash Borer: Buyer Beware on Treatments to Combat this Beetle!

The Emerald Ash Borer have decimated Ash Trees all over the country. Although some trees are still treatable, it’s important to know whether or not it’s too late for your tree before paying for treatments. The experts at Giroud Tree and Lawn explain what the Emerald Ash Borer is, how it’s destroying Ash Trees, and how to know if your tree is worth treating.

What is the Emerald Ash Borer?

Emerald Ash Borer is a 100% Fatal Pest that is killing Ash trees all over North America, and these insects are fast killers! Ash trees infested with Emerald Ash Borers die within 1-3 years. The adult borers swarm the tree and lay eggs under the bark. Once the larvae emerge, they immediately start chewing their way through the wood of the tree. Imagine the veins of your body with blood flowing freely through them. In much the same way, the veins in the grains of the tree allow water to flow through the tree. When the larvae chew through the wood, they cut off water circulation. Additionally, the adult beetles create thousands of exit wounds as they leave the tree, further causing damage that dries out the tree.

Emerald Ash Borers Kill Ash Trees

How to Know if Your Ash Tree is Treatable

If more than ½ of the tree’s crown is dead, the Ash cannot be saved. Unfortunately, a dead Ash tree quickly becomes a safety hazard. Tree removal will be necessary, especially if the dead Ash is located  near your home, driveway or play area.

Emerald Ash Borers Kill Ash Trees

The secret to saving your Ash tree hinges on two absolutely critical factors:

  1. Health: Unless the Ash tree is still relatively healthy, no one should try to sell you treatment.  According to over a decade of university research, more than 50% of the tree’s crown must be alive and intact to be eligible for treatment.  To ensure the best outcome, Giroud uses an even higher health threshold.  We will not recommend treatment unless 70% of the Ash tree’s crown is alive and healthy.  
  1. Treatment Options: Emerald Ash Borer multiply quickly and are incredibly fast killers.  In good conscience, a company should not take money for treatments unless the tree can be fully protected from the beetle. While other treatments may reduce Emerald Ash Borer populations by 30-60%, the deadly pest can still be in the tree and continue to destroy it over time. 

 

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Tree-Age is the Only Treatment Giroud Recommends to treat Emerald Ash Borer

As reported on EmeraldAshBorer.info, in side by side university research only one treatment, Emamectin benzoate (brand name: Tree-age), virtually wiped out Emerald Ash Borer leaving only .2% in the tree after two years. 

“Emamectin benzoate consistently provides at least two years of EAB control with a single application, even in large and very large trees under intense pest pressure. It also provided a higher level of control than other products in side-by-side studies”

Check out this video to see how Giroud treats Ash Trees against Emerald Ash Borer with Tree-age:

 

Take Action Now Before it’s Too Late

This species of beetle is reported in most of North America. At this point, it’s not a question of IF your Ash Tree will become infested with the Emerald Ash Borer, it’s a matter of WHEN it WILL BE Infested!

Don’t wait.  Take the following steps now: 

  1. Inspection: Have your Giroud Arborist evaluate the tree and recommend the best action.
  2. Tree Removal: If the Ash tree is dead or has become unsafe, prompt removal is required.
  3. Treatment: If the Ash tree is still healthy enough to absorb treatment, a systemic trunk injection of Tree-age® every two years protects Ash from Emerald Ash Borers.
  4. Regular Pruning: In combination with treatment, remove deadwood and prune to promote healthy growth.

Give Giroud a call at 215-682-7704 to schedule your FREE evaluation!

 

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Author: Cindy Giroud

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