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How to control Japanese beetles

How to Control Japanese Beetles

Japanese Beetles are pretty, but they are incredibly damaging to your plants! Some trees and shrubs are attacked year after year, which can be very frustrating for homeowners. Read on to learn how you can fight back against this beetle with some help from Giroud!

Beautiful but Destructive

Treatment for Japanese Beetles
Japanese Beetles can be treated, but proper timing is imperative!

Their shells glimmer in the summer sun, but don’t let Japanese Beetles fool you! They have a voracious appetite! Once they land on your property, they will chew through leaves in no time, leaving a wake of destruction on some of your favorite plants.

Japanese Beetles can emerge in swarms in June through July.  Once they hit, these annoying and damaging pests will feast on your plants through September.

Trees and Shrubs Japanese Beetles Attack

Japanese Beetles love to eat a variety of trees and shrubs. In fact, they have been known to attack more than 300 different types of trees, shrubs, and plants! The most common include:
  • Roses
  • Flowering Cherry
  • Flowering Crabapple
  • Linden
  • Birch
You can tell these insects have been chomping on your plants because damaged leaf tissue takes on a skeletonized appearance. This is because the beetles feed between the leaf veins.

How to Control Japanese Beetles

If the leaves of your plants look “skeletonized”, look around for the shiny bugs. They usually don’t travel too far once they find a tasty tree! It’s vital that you have your ISA Certified Giroud Arborist inspect any trees and shrubs as soon as possible. Successful control depends on applying treatment when the Beetles are first spotted!

If you are concerned about Beetles or had a problem last summer, call 215-682-7704 today to schedule an inspection by your Giroud Arborist.  He will identify your high-risk plants and if necessary put you on our Beetle Treatment schedule.

Author: Jeanne Hafner

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